Heirloom Seed List for 1-acre Garden

1) October Bean – Beans are rich in fiber and an inexpensive source of protein. This Native American variety dates back to the 1830’s from the Cherokee Nation in Tennessee. Prolific producer, great winter staple. Bush habit, 85-90 days. 200 seeds per Seed Bank.

2) Black Valentine Bean, Stringless – Straight slender dark-green, nearly round pads, stringless at all stages. 16-18 in. plants, hardy, good for early plantings, good shipper, very old heirloom, pre-1850, introduced by seedsman Peter Henderson in 1897. 48 to 70 days. 300 seeds per Seed Bank.

3) Bountiful Bean – In 1897 Abel Steele of Ferguson, Ontario won a $25.00 prize for naming this new variety from Peter Henderson & Company, previously known as “Green Bush Bean #1.” Heavy crops of excellent quality, brittle, stringless 6-7″ pods. Productive bush plants grow 16″ tall, 47-50 days. 200 seeds per Seed Bank.

4) Detroit Dark Red Beet – Introduced in 1892; original selections were made from Early Blood Turnip by Mr. Reeves of Port Hope, Ontario. Nearly globe, blood-red 3″ diameter roots. Beets are often credited in folk medicine for gallbladder and liver health, and they have natural anti-inflammatory properties. Delicious fresh, great for canning. Prolific, good keeper.  60-65 days. 300 seeds per Seed Bank.

5) Copenhagen Market Cabbage – Introduced by H. Hartman & Co. in 1909. Solid heads reach 6-8″ in diameter, weigh 3-4 pounds and rarely burst. Medium sized plants ideal for small gardens. Cabbage is a part of the brassica family of vegetables, which are known for their cancer-protective properties. 63-100 days from transplant. 300 seeds per Seed Bank.

6) Stowell’s Evergreen Corn – The original strain of this variety was bred by Nathaniel Newman Stowell, born May 16, 1793 in New Ipswich, Massachusetts. After years of refining the strain, Nathaniel sold two ears of seed for $4.00 to a friend who agreed to use it only for his private use. His “friend” then turned around and sold the seed for $20,000 and it was introduced to the seed trade in 1848. His variety is still the leading white variety for home gardens and market growers. Ears grow 8-9″ long and have 14-20 rows of kernels, 1-2 ears per stalk, holds well. 80-100 days. 250 seeds per Seed Bank.

7) Reid’s Yellow Dent Corn – Old-timer, well adapted to Southern heat and soils, vigorous 6 – 7 ft. plant, 9-10 in. double well filled ears,high protein. Developed by James L. Reid in northern Illinois. This late large reddish corn was crossed with an earlier yellow dent to create the modern Reid’s Yellow Dent. 85-110 days. 300 seeds per Seed Bank.

8) Bushy Cucumber – Enjoy the cool, satisfying crunch of cucumber in your salads. This well-know older variety originated in Russia. Recommended for dacha gardens that surround Moscow because of its compact “bush” plants with 3-5 foot vines. Good production for fresh eating or picking. 46-49 days. For earlier harvest, start indoors before the last frost. 90 seeds per Seed Bank.

9) Yellow Of Parma Onion – A top-quality, late-maturing onion with handsome, golden, upright globe-shaped bulbs. Average size is 1 pound. One of the best for storage. Imported from Italy. 110 days from transplant. 1000 seeds per Seed Bank.

10) Bloomsdale Spinach – Vigorous, upright plants. Dark glossy green leave are thick, twisted, crumpled, and blistered. Fine quality, very tender, excellent flavor. Rich in Vitamins A and K, rich in lutein and zeaxanthin, a good source of folate, Vitamin C, potassium, and more. Quick growing, heavy yields, well adapted for late spring or summer plantings, slow to bolt. Introduced before 1908. 39-60 days. 400 seeds per Seed Bank.

11) Scarlet Nantez Carrot – Cylindrical roots are 7″ long by 1“” wide. Bright reddish-orange flesh, fine-grained, nearly coreless, great flavor, sweet and brittle. Good as baby carrots. Good for storage, freezing and for juice. Variety chosen for its extremely high anti-oxidant constituents. Widely adapted, highly selected, uniform strain. 65-70 days. 1,050 seeds per Seed Bank.

12) Red Salad Bowl Lettuce – Large decorative upright plants with wide leaves that are crisp and delicious. One of our best performers. Beautiful deep-lobed bronze leaves, 6″ tall and 14-16″ wide plants. Very slow to bolt. Introduced to U.S. gardeners in 1955. Looseleaf, 50 days. 1,750 seeds per Seed Bank.

13) Oakleaf Lettuce – Known as Baltimore or Philadelphia Oakleaf in the 1880’s. Resistant to hot weather, long-standing, never bitter. Excellent quality even in late summer. Looseleaf, 50 days. 1,750 seeds per Seed Bank.

14) Hale’s Best Melon – A reliable early melon with heavy netting and firm salmon colored flesh. Good flavor and drought tolerant. Fruits are round and weigh 3-4 pounds.  Introduced in 1923. Melons are ripe when they “slip” off the vine.  Hale’s Best should be harvested just prior to “full slip” or when you might still need to pull a bit to make them slip off the vine. A serving of this melon delivers 100% of the recommended daily allowance of Vitamins A and C. 175 seeds per Seed Bank.

15) Green Arrow Pea – An English main crop variety, a standard home and market variety. Medium-size vines grow 24-28″ tall. Slim pointed pods are 4-5″ long and contain 8-11 small deep-green peas. Pods are almost always borne in doubles. Very heavy, reliable production. Shell, 62-70 days. 500 seeds per Seed Bank.

16) Fordhook Giant Chard – Introduced in 1934 by W. Atlee Burpee and Co. Broad dark green heavily crumpled leaves with white veins and stalks. Plants grow 24-28″ high with 2½” wide stalks. Abundant crops all season and even after the first light frosts. 50-60 days. 200 seeds per Seed Bank.

17) Brandywine Tomato – (a.k.a. Red Brandywine) The original Brandywine introduced by Johnson and Stokes in 1889, the large vines produce fruits that are 8-12 ounces and deep red in color. Tomatoes are an excellent source of Vitamins A and C, along with protective antioxidants. Very productive, excellent taste. Indeterminate, 80 days. 200 seeds per Seed Bank.

18) California Wonder Pepper – First introduced in 1928. This is one of the best for the home gardener, long known as a great canning and freezing variety. Heavy sets of 4-lobed, 4″ blocky fruits that ripen from green to red. An excellent source of Vitamins A and C.  Start indoors; 70-75 days from transplant. 50 seeds per Seed Bank.

19) Early Jalapeno Pepper – The earliest Jalapeno, does well even in cool areas. Sturdy 24″ plants are loaded with 3″ fruits that ripen from green to red. Fruits are mild when green, but hotter when red and fully ripe. Great for pickling. 60-70 days from transplant. 50 seeds per Seed Bank.

20) French Breakfast Radish – Oblong and blunt, rose-scarlet with a white tip. White, crisp flesh, mildly pungent flavor, top quality. Sow in the spring or fall, pick when small. A garden standard since the 1880s. 30 days from transplant. 900 seeds per Seed Bank.

21) Waltham Butternut Squash – Prized for its uniform shape, rich dry yellow-orange flesh, nutty flavor and high-yielding vines. Good source of healthful carotenoids. Fruits are 3-6 pounds and exceptional keepers. The result of years of patient refinement and selection by Bob Young of Waltham, Massachusetts. One of the most recognized types of baking squash. AAS winner in 1970. 83-100 days. 40 seeds per Seed Bank.

22) Rossa Bianca Eggplant – Stunning Italian heirloom, beautiful fruits are prized by chefs. Very meaty 4-6″ round fruits, mild flavor and almost never bitter. Well suited for all of your cooking needs, great for Eggplant Parmigiano. 80 days from transplant. 50 seeds per seed bank.

Source: Thanks to Dae Anderson

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About Jerome the Gnome

Hi, there! I'm the chief garden gnome and live in and manage the mushroom patch at EZGrowMushrooms.com where all the little garden gnomes work tirelessly to assemble our mushroom grow kits for your home and garden.
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