Heirloom Seed List for 1-acre Garden

1) October Bean – Beans are rich in fiber and an inexpensive source of protein. This Native American variety dates back to the 1830’s from the Cherokee Nation in Tennessee. Prolific producer, great winter staple. Bush habit, 85-90 days. 200 seeds per Seed Bank.

2) Black Valentine Bean, Stringless – Straight slender dark-green, nearly round pads, stringless at all stages. 16-18 in. plants, hardy, good for early plantings, good shipper, very old heirloom, pre-1850, introduced by seedsman Peter Henderson in 1897. 48 to 70 days. 300 seeds per Seed Bank.

3) Bountiful Bean – In 1897 Abel Steele of Ferguson, Ontario won a $25.00 prize for naming this new variety from Peter Henderson & Company, previously known as “Green Bush Bean #1.” Heavy crops of excellent quality, brittle, stringless 6-7″ pods. Productive bush plants grow 16″ tall, 47-50 days. 200 seeds per Seed Bank.

4) Detroit Dark Red Beet – Introduced in 1892; original selections were made from Early Blood Turnip by Mr. Reeves of Port Hope, Ontario. Nearly globe, blood-red 3″ diameter roots. Beets are often credited in folk medicine for gallbladder and liver health, and they have natural anti-inflammatory properties. Delicious fresh, great for canning. Prolific, good keeper.  60-65 days. 300 seeds per Seed Bank.

5) Copenhagen Market Cabbage – Introduced by H. Hartman & Co. in 1909. Solid heads reach 6-8″ in diameter, weigh 3-4 pounds and rarely burst. Medium sized plants ideal for small gardens. Cabbage is a part of the brassica family of vegetables, which are known for their cancer-protective properties. 63-100 days from transplant. 300 seeds per Seed Bank.

6) Stowell’s Evergreen Corn – The original strain of this variety was bred by Nathaniel Newman Stowell, born May 16, 1793 in New Ipswich, Massachusetts. After years of refining the strain, Nathaniel sold two ears of seed for $4.00 to a friend who agreed to use it only for his private use. His “friend” then turned around and sold the seed for $20,000 and it was introduced to the seed trade in 1848. His variety is still the leading white variety for home gardens and market growers. Ears grow 8-9″ long and have 14-20 rows of kernels, 1-2 ears per stalk, holds well. 80-100 days. 250 seeds per Seed Bank.

7) Reid’s Yellow Dent Corn – Old-timer, well adapted to Southern heat and soils, vigorous 6 – 7 ft. plant, 9-10 in. double well filled ears,high protein. Developed by James L. Reid in northern Illinois. This late large reddish corn was crossed with an earlier yellow dent to create the modern Reid’s Yellow Dent. 85-110 days. 300 seeds per Seed Bank.

8) Bushy Cucumber – Enjoy the cool, satisfying crunch of cucumber in your salads. This well-know older variety originated in Russia. Recommended for dacha gardens that surround Moscow because of its compact “bush” plants with 3-5 foot vines. Good production for fresh eating or picking. 46-49 days. For earlier harvest, start indoors before the last frost. 90 seeds per Seed Bank.

9) Yellow Of Parma Onion – A top-quality, late-maturing onion with handsome, golden, upright globe-shaped bulbs. Average size is 1 pound. One of the best for storage. Imported from Italy. 110 days from transplant. 1000 seeds per Seed Bank.

10) Bloomsdale Spinach – Vigorous, upright plants. Dark glossy green leave are thick, twisted, crumpled, and blistered. Fine quality, very tender, excellent flavor. Rich in Vitamins A and K, rich in lutein and zeaxanthin, a good source of folate, Vitamin C, potassium, and more. Quick growing, heavy yields, well adapted for late spring or summer plantings, slow to bolt. Introduced before 1908. 39-60 days. 400 seeds per Seed Bank.

11) Scarlet Nantez Carrot – Cylindrical roots are 7″ long by 1“” wide. Bright reddish-orange flesh, fine-grained, nearly coreless, great flavor, sweet and brittle. Good as baby carrots. Good for storage, freezing and for juice. Variety chosen for its extremely high anti-oxidant constituents. Widely adapted, highly selected, uniform strain. 65-70 days. 1,050 seeds per Seed Bank.

12) Red Salad Bowl Lettuce – Large decorative upright plants with wide leaves that are crisp and delicious. One of our best performers. Beautiful deep-lobed bronze leaves, 6″ tall and 14-16″ wide plants. Very slow to bolt. Introduced to U.S. gardeners in 1955. Looseleaf, 50 days. 1,750 seeds per Seed Bank.

13) Oakleaf Lettuce – Known as Baltimore or Philadelphia Oakleaf in the 1880’s. Resistant to hot weather, long-standing, never bitter. Excellent quality even in late summer. Looseleaf, 50 days. 1,750 seeds per Seed Bank.

14) Hale’s Best Melon – A reliable early melon with heavy netting and firm salmon colored flesh. Good flavor and drought tolerant. Fruits are round and weigh 3-4 pounds.  Introduced in 1923. Melons are ripe when they “slip” off the vine.  Hale’s Best should be harvested just prior to “full slip” or when you might still need to pull a bit to make them slip off the vine. A serving of this melon delivers 100% of the recommended daily allowance of Vitamins A and C. 175 seeds per Seed Bank.

15) Green Arrow Pea – An English main crop variety, a standard home and market variety. Medium-size vines grow 24-28″ tall. Slim pointed pods are 4-5″ long and contain 8-11 small deep-green peas. Pods are almost always borne in doubles. Very heavy, reliable production. Shell, 62-70 days. 500 seeds per Seed Bank.

16) Fordhook Giant Chard – Introduced in 1934 by W. Atlee Burpee and Co. Broad dark green heavily crumpled leaves with white veins and stalks. Plants grow 24-28″ high with 2½” wide stalks. Abundant crops all season and even after the first light frosts. 50-60 days. 200 seeds per Seed Bank.

17) Brandywine Tomato – (a.k.a. Red Brandywine) The original Brandywine introduced by Johnson and Stokes in 1889, the large vines produce fruits that are 8-12 ounces and deep red in color. Tomatoes are an excellent source of Vitamins A and C, along with protective antioxidants. Very productive, excellent taste. Indeterminate, 80 days. 200 seeds per Seed Bank.

18) California Wonder Pepper – First introduced in 1928. This is one of the best for the home gardener, long known as a great canning and freezing variety. Heavy sets of 4-lobed, 4″ blocky fruits that ripen from green to red. An excellent source of Vitamins A and C.  Start indoors; 70-75 days from transplant. 50 seeds per Seed Bank.

19) Early Jalapeno Pepper – The earliest Jalapeno, does well even in cool areas. Sturdy 24″ plants are loaded with 3″ fruits that ripen from green to red. Fruits are mild when green, but hotter when red and fully ripe. Great for pickling. 60-70 days from transplant. 50 seeds per Seed Bank.

20) French Breakfast Radish – Oblong and blunt, rose-scarlet with a white tip. White, crisp flesh, mildly pungent flavor, top quality. Sow in the spring or fall, pick when small. A garden standard since the 1880s. 30 days from transplant. 900 seeds per Seed Bank.

21) Waltham Butternut Squash – Prized for its uniform shape, rich dry yellow-orange flesh, nutty flavor and high-yielding vines. Good source of healthful carotenoids. Fruits are 3-6 pounds and exceptional keepers. The result of years of patient refinement and selection by Bob Young of Waltham, Massachusetts. One of the most recognized types of baking squash. AAS winner in 1970. 83-100 days. 40 seeds per Seed Bank.

22) Rossa Bianca Eggplant – Stunning Italian heirloom, beautiful fruits are prized by chefs. Very meaty 4-6″ round fruits, mild flavor and almost never bitter. Well suited for all of your cooking needs, great for Eggplant Parmigiano. 80 days from transplant. 50 seeds per seed bank.

Source: Thanks to Dae Anderson

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The Richest Man in the World: a Parable about Robotics, Abundance, Technological Change, Unemployment, Happiness, and a Basic Income

http://www.youtube.com/v/p14bAe6AzhA&hl=en_US&feature=player_embedded&version=3

By: Paul D. Fernhout

Source: Thanks to youtube at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p14bAe6AzhA

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Eat Well & Be Healthy (& Happier!)

The significance of this most basic of human needs—not just eating, but eating well—is often overlooked or pushed aside with the demands of busy, daily life. Yet how we feel on a day-to-day basis, and how healthy we are—and remain—is reliant upon this one thing more than anything else. You have the power to influence your health profoundly, not just now but for the years to come, by the choices you make in your diet today.  As good ol’ Hippocrates once said, “Let food be your medicine, and medicine be your food.”

So, let’s skip the New Year’s resolutions this year (too much wiggle-room!). Instead, let’s make a commitment: A commitment to start eating healthier. A small change each day will soon add up to benefits bigger than you would have ever imagined: more energy, improved sleep, weight loss, less aches and pains, better sex, improved mood, improved ability to handle stress… better health can be yours, and it’s not complicated. Best of all, it will be fun! We’ll all do it together, here, and I’ll start by sharing a few simple tips for healthier eating in 2011:

•  Choose more brightly colored fruits and vegetables – those oranges, reds, and yellows indicate they’re loaded with healthy antioxidants and protective nutrients like carotenoids

•  Eat a wider variety of fruits, vegetables, and mushrooms to broaden your intake of beneficial phytonutrients
•  Eat more berries (ok!)
•  As much as possible, choose organically grown foods – these are not only better for you, they’re better for the planet due to sustainable farming practices
•  Choose less processed, packaged foods and more whole, closer-to-their-natural-state foods

Source: thanks to NaturalWellbeing.com

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A New Flush of Shrooms

Yesterday morning I woke up to see a new flush of what I think are the oyster mushrooms growing in the backyard.  I couldn’t believe it!  I thought they’d stopped growing for the winter, but the relative humidity must’ve been just right for fruiting.  I made a mental note to gather them up and do a little more experimenting.  Confound it, I forgot to do it, and last night we had a hard freeze.  They seem to have survived the cold overnight, but are probably freeze-dried by now and have lost their tender chewiness. :-(

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Life Lessons

Writes columnist, Regina Brett:

“To celebrate growing older, I once wrote the 45 lessons life taught me.  It is the most-requested column I’ve ever written. My odometer rolls over to 50 this week, so here’s an update:

1. Life isn’t fair, but it’s still good.

2. When in doubt, just take the next small step.

3. Life is too short to waste time hating anyone.

4. Don’t take yourself so seriously. No one else does.

5. Pay off your credit cards every month.

6. You don’t have to win every argument. Agree to disagree.

7. Cry with someone. It’s more healing than crying alone.

8. It’s OK to get angry with God. He can take it.

9. Save for retirement starting with your first paycheck.

10. When it comes to chocolate, resistance is futile.

11. Make peace with your past so it won’t screw up the present.

12. It’s OK to let your children see you cry.

13. Don’t compare your life to others’. You have no idea what their journey is all about.

14. If a relationship has to be a secret, you shouldn’t be in it.

15. Everything can change in the blink of an eye. But don’t worry; God never blinks.

16. Life is too short for long pity parties. Get busy living, or get busy dying.

17. You can get through anything if you stay put in today.

18. A writer writes. If you want to be a writer, write.

19. It’s never too late to have a happy childhood. But the second one is up to you and no one else.

20. When it comes to going after what you love in life, don’t take no for an answer.

21. Burn the candles, use the nice sheets, wear the fancy lingerie. Don’t save it for a special occasion. Today is special.

22. Overprepare, then go with the flow.

23. Be eccentric now. Don’t wait for old age to wear purple.

24. The most important sex organ is the brain.

25. No one is in charge of your happiness except you.

26. Frame every so-called disaster with these words: “In five years, will this matter?”

27. Always choose life.

28. Forgive everyone everything.

29. What other people think of you is none of your business.

30. Time heals almost everything. Give time time.

31. However good or bad a situation is, it will change.

32. Your job won’t take care of you when you are sick. Your friends will. Stay in touch.

33. Believe in miracles.

34. God loves you because of who God is, not because of anything you did or didn’t do.

35. Whatever doesn’t kill you really does make you stronger.

36. Growing old beats the alternative – dying young.

37. Your children get only one childhood. Make it memorable.

38. Read the Psalms. They cover every human emotion.

39. Get outside every day. Miracles are waiting everywhere.

40. If we all threw our problems in a pile and saw everyone else’s, we’d grab ours back.

41. Don’t audit life. Show up and make the most of it now.

42. Get rid of anything that isn’t useful, beautiful or joyful.

43. All that truly matters in the end is that you loved.

44. Envy is a waste of time. You already have all you need.

45. The best is yet to come.

46. No matter how you feel, get up, dress up and show up.

47. Take a deep breath. It calms the mind.

48. If you don’t ask, you don’t get.

49. Yield.

50. Life isn’t tied with a bow, but it’s still a gift.”

By Regina Brett

Source: “Regina Brett’s 45 life lessons and 5 to grow on,” Cleveland Plain Dealer, originally published 28 May 06, updated 03 Apr 08, at http://www.cleveland.com/brett/blog/index.ssf/2006/05/regina_bretts_45_life_lessons.html

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How to Grow Mushrooms from Spores

Source: Thanks to FungiFun.org at http://www.mahalo.com/mushrooms

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Mushroom Bourguignon

The best part about this — well, besides all of it, if I can so humbly say — is that it’s a bourguignon without the heft of beef, but all of the indulgence. Plus, since you don’t need to braise it in the oven for three hours, it can be a weekday night dinner. And you can serve it to vegetarians. And nobody will miss a thing.

Serves 4

Ingredients

2 tablespoons olive oil
2 tablespoons butter, softened
2 pounds portabella mushrooms, in 1/4-inch slices (save the stems for another use) (you can use cremini instead, as well)
1/2 carrot, finely diced
1 small yellow onion, finely diced
2 cloves garlic, minced
1 cup full-bodied red wine
2 cups beef or vegetable broth (beef broth is traditional but vegetable to make it vegetarian; it works with either)
2 tablespoons tomato paste
1 teaspoon fresh thyme leaves (1/2 teaspoon dried)
1 1/2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
1 cup pearl onions, peeled (thawed if frozen)
Egg noodles, for serving
Sour cream and chopped chives or parsley, for garnish (optional)

Preparation

Heat the one tablespoon of the olive oil and one tablespoon of butter in a medium Dutch oven or heavy sauce pan over high heat. Sear the mushrooms until they begin to darken, but not yet release any liquid — about three or four minutes. Remove them from pan.

Lower the flame to medium and add the second tablespoon of olive oil. Toss the carrots, onions, thyme, a few good pinches of salt and a several grinds of black pepper into the pan and cook for 10, stirring occasionally, until the onions are lightly browned. Add the garlic and cook for just one more minute.

Add the wine to the pot, scraping any stuck bits off the bottom, then turn the heat all the way up and reduce it by half. Stir in the tomato paste and the broth. Add back the mushrooms with any juices that have collected and once the liquid has boiled, reduce the temperature so it simmers for 20 minutes, or until mushrooms are very tender. Add the pearl onions and simmer for five minutes more.

Combine remaining butter and the flour with a fork until combined; stir it into the stew. Lower the heat and simmer for 10 more minutes. If the sauce is too thin, boil it down to reduce to the right consistency. Season to taste.

To serve, spoon the stew over a bowl of egg noodles, dollop with sour cream (optional) and sprinkle with chives or parsley.

Source: Thanks to Smitten Kitchen at http://smittenkitchen.com/2009/01/mushroom-bourguignon/

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